Menstrual Hygiene Day Preparations

As part of our preparations for Menstrual Hygiene Day, FAWEZI is collecting sanitary ware to give to girls in need. Contribute to our 1 month sanitary pads collection drive and help us donate sanitary pads to disadvantaged girls in selected project areas in the Chitungwiza and Shamva Districts. The sanitary pads will be handed over to the girls on the Menstrual Hygiene Day (MH day) – May 28. On the day we will also hold dialogues with the girls on healthy menstrual management. Individuals and organisations can donate the sanitary pads or cash/transfer to make the purchase. MH Day provides a platform to break the silence, raise awareness, and change negative social norms around Menstrual Health Management, it also engages decision-makers to increase the political and economic priority and catalyses action for MHM, at global, national, and local levels.  WhatsApp questions or send ecocash donations to 0785541612.

SRHR Service Providers Dialogue

Barriers to Sexual and Reproductive Health (SRH) services and information put girls’ health at risk. Inconsistent laws and policies relating to the age at which girls are able to access SRHR services without parental consent; stigma and taboo around the sexual activity of adolescents; a lack of comprehensive sexuality education, and other inconsistencies continue to negatively impact girls’ sexual and reproductive health. FAWEZI held a dialogue with SRH service providers from Chitungwiza today to discuss the policies surrounding SRH for adolescents.
Our aims were:

  • To interrogate existing SRHR services for Adolescents Girls and Young Women (AGYW) in and out of school, including the disabled.
  • To identify commonly sought services among AGYW, the availability of the services, and challenges being faced in accessing them
  • To analyze existing policies guiding SRH service provision .

The discussions buttressed the need to further build the capacity of service providers, especially on delivering SRH services to adolescent girls considering religious and cultural beliefs, ages of consent, and stigmatization. Thank you AmplifyChange for helping us maximize opportunities for adolescents and young women’s access to SRH awareness.

The SRHR Dialogues Continue

More Sexual and Reproductive health Rights (SRHR) dialogues and more opportunities for FAWEZI to speak with school girls about the challenges they are facing. At Shamva’s Ming – Chang Primary School the girls echoed issues of harmful religious and cultural practices as one of the major threats to their well-being. We had an emotional session as we listened to the girls confide their fears regarding the prevalence of child marriages fueled by these beliefs and practices in their communities. We also spoke about Menstrual Health Management, children’s rights and responsibilities. Thank you AmplifyChange for supporting our work in maximizing the opportunities for adolescents and young women’s SRHR awareness.

More Sexual and Reproductive Health Talks

More Sexual and Reproductive Health Rights #SRHR dialogues with our girls in schools. At Wadzanayi Primary and Secondary school in Shamva the girls proved to have information on most of the issues like menstrual hygiene and all forms of child abuse. The girls shared challenges on issues of harmful cultural beliefs – Chiramu and drug and substance abuse. Thank you AmplifyChange for funding our work and allowing us to foster and encourage dialogues on the multifaceted nature of SRHR.

SRHR Dialogue in Shamva

We continue to share experiences form our Sexual and Reproductive Health Rights dialogues – this time from Madziwa Mine Primary and Secondary schools in Shamva. We spoke about child rights and responsibilities, and about SRHR nuances with students from a range of ages and backgrounds. Our facilitators from the School District Office engaged learners in an exercise to identify their rights and responsibilities as well. As FAWEZI we led the conversations into more details of SRHR. Most questions raised from the Primary and Secondary children revolved around sexual abuse and menstrual hygiene management. Lack of sanitary wear , inadequate ablution facilities, and the ‘cloak of silence’ around menstruation issues at home, were the major challenges raised by girls.